The Book of Zhuangzi

The Book of Zhuangzi consists of three volumes, but it is believed that only the first half of the first volume was written by Zhuangzi, and the rest by his disciples and followers. I think that makes sense, because the first half of Vol. 1 has most of the core principles and is beautifully composed (regarded as one of Chinese greatest literary works), while the remaining are largely examples (many of which are sarcastic and cynical). Here are some highlights of the Book, based on my very limited and personal understanding.

The joy of piano playing

Within my circle, I can easily win the title “Most persistent music learner”. I have played musical instruments for 15 years, started with guitar then transitioned to piano. That is not something extraordinary. The special part is that I’ve never been good at any of them but always at beginner level. Being a failed traveler on an incomplete journey, what do I write when I write about piano? Joy. Whenever I sit at the piano, I find myself immersed in a different world with fair rules, clear instructions, the challenge to interpret them, the beauty of music, the joy of making sound and the responsibility for mistakes.

Journey to the West

Every summer, the full 40 episodes of “Journey to the West” series are broadcasted on Vietnamese national television. It is a TV series by Chinese CCTV dated back in 1986, based on the Chinese classic of the same name. Vietnamese kids and adults love it. So do I. I can’t remember how many times I had watched it. It is the story about a team of four characters (and a horse) setting out a trip to the Buddhist land in the West of China (i.e. India) to bring back the sacred Buddhist scriptures. It is a long, difficult and dangerous journey. The team travels through many kingdoms and encounters all kinds of obstacles and evils along the way. Each episode is a distinct adventure with its own background and development, sometimes very complex.